Monday, August 24, 2015

Village Trip

Last weekend my husband asked me if I would like to go on a village trip. Unbeknownst to him I had been praying about the possibilities of doing this. In my mind I was thinking some grand hike with only what we could fit in our back packs and scavenging for food, well not that bad, but you get the idea--sleeping on the ground, maybe a tent, cooking over a fire.
THANKFULLY, that is not what God had in mind for us.


This was supposed to be an easy trip. A 3 hour bus ride on nice roads, stay the night in a hotel, and then take a 30 minute bus ride up to the village. 

In Nepal nothing is done on time or in the time range you are given--usually. so I was planning for a 7 hour bus ride and a 3 hour truck ride.

We got up at 5:30am on Friday morning and finished getting ready. I wasn't sure what to pack and I didn't want to bring everything. I kept reminding myself we would only be gone for 1 night. We wound up with a change of clothes for everyone, and three for Emily, two for Jason because he was going to be baptized, disposable diapers--because I didn't want to carry around our cloth ones, 2 small blankets in case someone had to sleep on the floor, a flannel sheet just in case, one towel to share, a small pillow, a teddy bear for Abby's pillow,  toiletries--including toilet paper, and umbrellas. This came out to 2 small/medium sized duffle bags and 3 back packs. On top of that we had school supplies, Bibles, and backpacks for about 30 people. 

We finally made it out of the house at 7am. Thankfully, I made banana bread the day before so we brought that for breakfast. We took a taxi to the bus stand and met up with our Tamang friend whose village we were going to. 

There was no one on the bus so they had us sit wherever we wanted. At first glance this is awesome! But because of that we had to sit on the side of the road for an hour waiting for more passengers--but it's okay I had planned for a 7 hour ride. I sat on the side of the bus next to the door because it had a lot of leg room. I had Emily in my carrier, which I don't know what I would do without! Had I known the driver was going to keep the door open the entire time I might have moved, but thankfully Emily did great in the pouch the whole time! I fed her at the first stop and she went right back in and slept most of the time.


We arrived to Dhading 4 hours after we left; I was impressed at how close to the time we were supposed to arrive that we actually arrived.


We found our hotel room, again I was pleasantly surprised. We had a small room, but there was a queen size bed and a single bed, a tv, a bathroom--with a normal toilet, and an AIR CONDITIONER, and a fan that went around like a hurricane--It was amazing and very comfortable. After being in the room for a while we realized we had some little visitors--thankfully not roaches, only tiny ants. So no one slept on the floor. The boys had the single bed, and Luke, Emily, Abby, and I all slept in the queen size bed. It actually wasn't that bad! If it weren't for the AC it would have been quite uncomfortable, but thankfully the Lord had given us a little special blessing.


The next morning we got up early thinking the pastor was coming at 6am and we were leaving then. But by 7:30 he still hadn't shown up. Once he got there we took off in a big truck. This truck was humongous. I got to sit in the front and the seat was head high to me and I am 5 ft. 9in. We drove to a nearby shop and wouldn't you know what we pull up beside?


Yes, that is a goat without a head, and yes that man is touching the unattached goat head!


Let's just say my kids got a good lesson in anatomy! My husband kept saying, "It's okay, their cousins live on a farm and do this all this time. They have to learn some time." They dissected this goat in front of the kids. Thankfully it was already dead by the time we arrived. 5 minutes earlier and we would have witnessed the decapitation!


We took off up the road, thankfully I had a chance to feed Emily before we left. The 30 minute drive turned in to 2 hours of bouncing and sliding all over the mountain in the mud. I have to admit I was a little afraid of going over the edge and Abby was really scared at times. But we did well.




 


There were so many people standing around the two trucks just staring at the giant hole in the road and no place to go. Everyone was just looking around. This boy down in the hole is the only one actually doing anything to help. He found several large rocks and stacked them up to fill in the gap.



The people from the village we went to visit.



We arrived at the village and had a short walk to the village itself. It is monsoon so everything is slippery. Over the course of the day I slipped and fell three times and hurt my ankle--we will call those war wounds. :) Thankfully the kids didn't get hurt. I used to go camping all the time and was used to uneasy grounds, but I must be getting soft! Oh well. 

Isn't this a dream house!

The people were so nice to us and extremely grateful. We had a quip trip to the squatty potty, which had recently been scrubbed clean. Cleaner than a lot of toilets I have seen, and then we headed to the church building.






This is the pathway to the church building, and that is a pretty steep drop off to the right.




You can see that one wall has fallen down and there are a lot of cracks everywhere. But we filed in and sat on the ground. It would cost approximately $10,000 to rebuild this one room church building.




They gave us these "welcome" scarves.


We sang together in Nepali and then they asked Luke to speak. So he gave an impromptu message and even did about half of it in Nepali. He did awesome, especially for not preparing ahead of time. 

Afterwards they fed us a delicious lunch and we headed over to the baptism area. It was a water reservoir for the rice fields. It had a beautiful view. 21 Tamang people were baptized that day, mostly adults.



There was an older lady you could tell was quite scared. She got in the water and when she went to be baptized she went down in the water but came up just a tad short for getting her whole head under the water, just the tip top of their head stuck out. But she jumped up and was climbing the ladder to get out. While she was scrambling out the the pastor threw water on the top of her head to make sure she was fully immersed. I feel for her, when I was baptized a picture revealed later that my foot came up out of the water during my baptism, so I know how she feels. 

These people still have "outhouses" and wash only with a bucket of water. Can you imagine the fear they must have of getting their whole bodies in the water including their head? But they were tough and you could see the love for the Lord they have. It was a wonderful time.
 


Our son Jason was saved almost 2 years ago, and for the last year has been asking about baptism. We wanted to make sure he clearly understood what he was doing so we have been waiting. Well we felt this would be a perfect time for him to be baptized so he made number 22 that day with his baptism. What a wonderful experience.




The trip down was a little easier than the trip up.  We got back to town just in time to get the last bus back to Kathmandu. We found out that there was going to be a bhanda (protest) the next two days and if we didn't make that bus we would be stuck there until it was over. Apparently everyone had the same thoughts.We paid for our tickets so we could have a seat on the bus, but that really only includes the seat itself and maybe 6 inches of air above the seat. Everything else is fair game for others. There were people squished in the middle aisle and some were hanging off the side of the bus. One lady was sitting on my arm rest and I had to lean sideways just so my head wouldn't be in her back. It was a long trip, but God helped us through it. I think we stopped literally every 5-10 minutes to pick up more people or let people off. We made it just to the outskirts of KTM, still a good hour from the buses destination which was still 30 minutes from our home. It took us 4.5 hours just to get there. At the first taxi stand we got out and made our way home skipping the last hour of the bus ride--it was well worth the extra money in the taxi fare.


All-in-all it was a great trip and I am happy to have met those wonderful people, and had the experience of a "village trip", even if it wasn't as adventurous as I first imagined, it was just enough for us!

3 comments:

  1. Sounds like a wonderful adventure. Beautiful pictures! I can't believe he got to baptised 22 people!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your right those roads are crazy and they drive even crazier! Didn't know your son was getting baptized too, very cool for him.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I so enjoy reading your blog! I know it is still going to be a few years before my husband and I will be able to come to Nepal as missionaries, but every time I read your blog I feel like I get a little insight to the missionary's wife life over there :) I love that you explain how the cooking is different there and I plan on practicing making things from scratch such as your pizza recipe before we even get over there :) Thank you for your wonderful testimony! My husband and I pray for your family very often!

    ReplyDelete